Wrap me up – Faux fur scarf

While the excitement is building up for the start of the Great British Sewing Bee, series 3 (I’m a Bee, I’m a Bee), I have to find an outlet for my excitement/ nail biting nervousness. Geez, I get sweaty palms even writing this sentence right now… So let me entertain you with a furry post, a make that I love but didn’t get to keep :(.

January was a good month for my social life, but not very good for churning out me-made projects. I had some really great incentives however because of two friends’ birthdays, to whom I wanted to offer some hand-made presents. Because of the season, I diverged from my classic presents (tote bags) and played with one of my favourite materials: faux fur. I love it, especially the really good quality that is available nowadays. Unfortunately, the good stuff is quite pricey, so scarves it is!

Faux mink scarf

This is a very quick project to make. In fact, it took me less to make the scarf than it took me to clean the sewing room carpet after I’ve finished. Note to self: make sure the next sewing room has wooden floors!!

Anyhow… Back to the scarf! I had a piece of faux mink that I had gotten a few years back in Romania, and out of which I had made hats and scarves for presents before. I had in mind to make a snood or an infinity scarf, but I soon realised there was not enough length for either. So I had to improvise and ended up with a rectangular piece, that wasn’t long enough to tie into a knot but wouldn’t work as a collar piece either. So I had the idea of making another little fur circle to hold the two pieces together.

Faux Mink scarf

As the base fabric of the fur was a sort of knit, I used my overlocker, because it is quicker and I wanted to keep the seam allowance as narrow as possible, without the danger of unravelling.  I also had to do a bit of hand sewing to finish off some hard to reach parts. A word of warning: don’t do what I did and tried to cut into the seam allowance, it will jam the knife and break the needles. Just sew at normal ovelocker width, with the seam allowance aligned to the edge of the machine.

So, here are the basic steps:

1.  Start with a long piece of fur, 30-40 cm wide and maybe 80 cm long. Fold it right side to right side lengthwise and pin the ends together. Then pin the long edge, leaving about a hand width open in the middle.

2. Stitch what you have pinned, making sure to backstitch before and after the the opening.

3. Turn on the right side through the opening that was left open, making sure the corners stay sharp.

4. Slipstitch the opening. Don’t worry if it’s not the most elegant hand stitching, it won’t really show in the fur.

5. For the closing circlet, start with a piece 15 cm long and about 5-7 cm wide (depending how thick the fur is). Fold lengthwise, making a tube, with a small opening in the middle, as above. Turn the tube halfway inside out, through the opening you made, making sure the ends come together right side to right side, like an infinity scarf (this is a bit hard to explain, so perhaps have a look at Youtube for an infinity or moebius scarf tutorial).

If you can, machine sew the ends together. My fur was quite thick, so I had to hand sew. Turn everything right side and slip stitch the opening.

Faux Mink scarf5153

6. Put the scarf around your neck and check what is the optimal position of the circlet, and hand baste it to the seam of the main part, so that the seam line of the circlet is not showing. This way, you make sure it will not get lost and where the scarf goes, the circlet goes too.

You can wear it with the two sides overlapping and kept together by the circlet.

Faux Mink scarf

Or with the two edges opposing each other through the circlet, and forming a sort of a bow.

Faux mink scarf

That’s all there is to it! My friend really liked it and hopefully it will keep her nice and toasty, now that we have snow in London too!

Happy sewing (and hoovering)!

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31 comments

  1. I told a friend I wanted to make a whole coat in fake fur. She said she supported my decision but wouldn’t be seen in public with me. Too much of a good thing apparently.

    Love your work. You have a clean and striking style. I look forward to seeing more of it on the telly!

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    1. There is never such thing as too much fake fur! I love it to bits!! My only problem is that it’s too expensive to make a coat as big as I would like. See Ginger’s coat at Ginger Makes, it looks amazing. These new fabrics are so incredibly realistic, nothing in common with the cringy 70s like fake furs.
      Thanks for watching and for appreciating my makes. Unfortunately, very hard to keep true to oneself’s style in the context of the challenges, but I will keep on living the dream here on the blog. Alex x

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  2. Hi Alex, we meet at the London meet-up when Lauren (Lladybird) was over. I just found you through Karen from DidYouMakeThat. I remembered you telling us about fainting while making your body double! I was watching you last night on TGBSB – glad to see you made it through to next week!

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    1. Hi Tamsin! Yes, I do remember, you had the most amazing pair of trousers you had made and we were talking sewing machines, I think you have an Elna if I remember correctly? Re the show, what can I say, it was even harder than it looked on the telly. But hey ho, lived to sew another week! Thanks for watching!

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  3. Do you think you can record the show for me on pendrive and sent it to me? I am sitting here and can’t access it because of slow internet.
    I think the photos are stunning and you are getting prettier by the day. Not only a great sewer, you are presenting your items great as well.

    Scarfs are always a useful accessory and looks quite elegant.

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    1. I really want to make as many as possible, I love faux fur so much. Any favourite kind of fur? I’m happy to make you one!! Now that the show aired, I’m a bit more relaxed 🙂

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    1. Thank you! I imagine something like this will come in handy in Canada :). If you figure out a way to watch outside UK, let me know, my mum is in another country and would love to see it too.

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      1. Don’t be silly! Thank you for finding it! I’m not sure what the BBC’s policy is on these things, so I will refrain from publishing officially at the moment, but hopefully people will find it in the comments. Thanks again!

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    1. Thank you so much for visiting, the comment and the kind wishes! I am seriously stressing about tonight, but hope you will enjoy it very much!

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    1. Thank you! First time I used the tripod/remote control shutter combo with my new camera. It was around midnight, so the light is a bit odd. Daylight next time, ha ha!

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      1. I like the dress yo have made – I have this patter for years in my stash. It was good to see the final, real dress. Great pattern for summer dress. I like your cherries pattern … so summer like!

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      2. Ha ha, it’s an old favourite, I have now made 3 versions + the one on the programme. A bit of a love/hate relationship at the moment, didn’t go very well on the show… 😦

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      3. Yes, it was pretty unlucky! I got really into the idea of the cupcake costume, but didn’t really get to practise it all that much, so wasn’t sure how long it will take. Live and learn! But back to normal life now, thank you for keeping in touch and following the blog.

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